Given an option to learn or remain ignorant, which do you choose?

I continue having fascinating online interactions. They convince me my wiring differs from most others’.

Case in point, someone contacted me with

I’m reaching out because I just put up my new dystopian science fiction novel as an ARC ebook on book funnel and wanted to reach out to you to see if you’d be willing to read and post a review on Goodreads and bookbub (amazon a little later, official release is 10/7/20). I’ve attached the book cover to hopefully entice your decision. I can send additional information if necessary as well. Also, lmk if you have a new book coming out and I will do the same for you. Thank you, hope all is well on your end. Be safe and be well.

First, kudos for asking before bamming me.

I responded
Continue reading “Given an option to learn or remain ignorant, which do you choose?”

Why It Works for Me – James Dickey’s “The Sheep Child”

This is the tenth in a series I’m doing wherein I discuss why a particular piece of writing works for me, aka, this piece of writing taught me something about writing, encouraged me to be a better writer, engaged me, captivated me, educated me, et cetera.

As I’ve written elsewhere, it’s one thing to know something is good, it’s a better thing (in my opinion) to know why it’s good and then be able to copy what’s good about it, to learn from it so you can be as good and (hopefully) better.

This time out, James Dickey’s “The Sheep Child” from his poetry collection, “The Whole Motion”.

 

 

Why It Works for Me – Brian Fagan’s “The Little Ice Age”

This is the ninth in a series I’m doing wherein I discuss why a particular piece of writing works for me, aka, this piece of writing taught me something about writing, encouraged me to be a better writer, engaged me, captivated me, educated me, et cetera.

As I’ve written elsewhere, it’s one thing to know something is good, it’s a better thing (in my opinion) to know why it’s good and then be able to copy what’s good about it, to learn from it so you can be as good and (hopefully) better.

This time out, Brian Fagan’s “The Little Ice Age”. I also shared Brian Fagan’s “The First North Americans” in episode seven.

 

 

Why It Works for Me – Truman Capote’s “The Grass Harp”

This is the eighth in a series I’m doing wherein I discuss why a particular piece of writing works for me, aka, this piece of writing taught me something about writing, encouraged me to be a better writer, engaged me, captivated me, educated me, et cetera.

As I’ve written elsewhere, it’s one thing to know something is good, it’s a better thing (in my opinion) to know why it’s good and then be able to copy what’s good about it, to learn from it so you can be as good and (hopefully) better.

This time out, Truman Capote’s “The Grass Harp”.

 

 

Talking about inspiration, titles, protagonists, genre, author toolkits and more with Patricia M. Osborne

West Sussex author and MA in Creative Writing scholar Patricia M. Osborne invited me to guest post on her blog.

 
She asked for ~500 words on writing.

She asked for it on a day I had a breakthrough on my work-in-progress.

I ended up writing about inspiration, figuring out book titles, defining protagonist issues, the difference between genre and literature, learning what’s in your author’s toolkit, and letting your writing educate you.

I enjoyed it. Hope you do, too.

Let us know what you think – Guest Feature – Joseph Carrabis.