Macauley and Lanning’s “Technique in Fiction”

A worthwhile read to get you to the next level regardless of what level you’re on

Nuance. Technique in Fiction is a must read because it teaches nuance.

It teaches much more. Just when I thought my brain had filled with as much technique and suggestion as possible, there’d be another bit that I had to write down and practice so I could remember it.

The basic takeaway is that authors should read this book after they’ve finished something big (novella, novel, novelette, noveletta, novina…okay, maybe not a novina) so they can figure out how to improve their writing during the rewrite/editing process. Story writers will also benefit provided they give themselves some down time between writing and editing so their minds can absorb what’s in these pages.

Great stuff!


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Analyzing Loren Eiseley’s “The Dance of the Frogs” as Horror

Real horror is subtle. It seduces.

One of the finest pieces of horror I’ve encountered is Loren Eiseley’s “The Dance of the Frogs“. I doubt Eiseley wrote this intending it to be horror. If he did, I have to find more horror writing by him (consider “The Fifth Planet“. Not quite horror but damn close). It is brilliant.

Horror done well is subtle. Horror can’t wack you over the head. It has to seduce you. It has to sneak up on you, entrap you. Horror, done well, must take you from comfort and peace to helplessness and inevitability.

Horror done well allows you no sure escape. Questions regarding safety, yes, freedom from worry, no. The original 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers movie (with the original ending and based on the Jack Finney novel, The Body Snatchers) is an excellent example of horror. Horrific things do not make good horror, horrifying situations make good horror.
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Greg Hickey – Rolling Your Own Forensic International Endurance Dystopia

Can you endure a philosophic discussion about forensics?

Forensic Dystopian Author Greg HickeyHello all and welcome to our continuing series of author interviews. Today’s guest knows about guns from a scientific point-of-view, about sports from an international point-of-view, about endurance from a training point-of-view and some how manages to merge all these into “roll you own” dystopian novels.

I’m afraid of needles, so it’s a good thing I’m not a diabetic or a heroin addict.

 
I’d like everyone to stand up and give Greg Hickey a big round of applause for taking part in our exciting adventure.

It’s always humbling to look at that first draft again.

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Joanell Serra’s The Vines We Planted is August Pick for Latino Book of the Month Club!

Joanell Serra’s The Vines We Planted Success Story!

Joanell Serra going bareback in wine countryThis just in from The Vines We Planted author Joanell Serra:

Hi Everyone!
It’s a hot August day in California. (90 here in Sonoma today. Yikes!)

I’ll give you my news quickly so I can get back in the pool!

The Vines We Planted has been chosen for the Latino Book of the Month Club for August.

I am so honored and excited to participate. (I could insert a video here of my happy dance when I found out, to the song “my vida loca” but I just won’t do that to you all.)
Continue reading “Joanell Serra’s The Vines We Planted is August Pick for Latino Book of the Month Club!”

Hecate and The Munching Wallendas

Table for five, please.

Remember Hecate? Remember her kits?

There are few things as joyful as entertaining a troop of raccoons. One year we had four mothers and their kits, nineteen racoons in all, in our backyard.

It was wonderful.

We still have near nightly munchings in our backyard. Sometimes we have late afternoon munchings. Hecate always comes first and most forward, although as the kits mature they get bolder. None have walked over my feet or nibbled my toes yet and there’s still time.

 
You may also remember Beryl. I mentioned that we probably also had a Berylia. I thought I’d seen Berylia. There was a rabbit that seemed slightly smaller than Beryl but such evidence is hearsay and not admissible in court.

Yesterday afternoon, when I went out to feed Hecate and her kits – their names, by the way; Festus, Jules, Verne and ‘Tricia (not an abbreviation of Patricia, simply ‘Tricia, thank you, please) I saw Berylia and Beryl. No videos yet. Hecate took exception to their munching clover while her kits were close by.

So it goes. The joys of motherhood.

You never know, though…they might be wascally wabbits.